Investigating the characteristics and efficacy of the Learning in Two Languages Program: A Research and development initiative

LTL_language attitudes assesment 1-2

Professor Alison Bailey, Ph.D.
Graduate School of Education & Information Studies
abailey@gseis.ucla.edu
Participants: Intermediate classrooms
Keywords: Dual Language Education, Linguistic Development


Professor Alison Bailey, Ph.D.
Graduate School of Education & Information Studies
 

Despite two decades of largely restrictive state and federal policies toward bilingual education in the United States, such programming has experienced a recent resurgence in the form of dual language immersion (DLI).  This demand signals a shift from viewing linguistic and cultural diversity as a challenge to be “overcome” to recognizing multilingualism and multiculturalism as assets to be fostered in young children (Bailey & Osipova, 2016). For dual language learners (DLL students) in English-dominant contexts, DLI programming offers the opportunity to learn language from English proficient peers and forestall the social isolation that they may experience in transitional bilingual education or sheltered English instruction (e.g., Steele et al., in press). For English dominant students, the experience can foster second language enrichment and broader cultural understanding, often signaling commitment to social justice and multiculturalism by their families (Bailey & Osipova, 2016).
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Science Through Technology Enhanced Play

Augmented Reality Learning Environment

Professor Noel Enyedy, Ph.D. Graduate School of Education & Information Studies

enyedy@ucla.edu

Participants: Primary classrooms

Key Words: Modeling, Science Education, Augmented Reality


This project has developed two science units–states of matter and pollination–that employ commercially available sensing equipment to support early elementary science classrooms to use play to model and simulate science concepts. The National Science Foundation, has awarded the team two follow up grants to add additional features such as the integration of iPads and more interactivity. The research findings of this study will inform the field about the ways in which young students can engage in authentic scientific modeling, and the ways that technological tools can enhance this process. Furthermore, the research findings will demonstrate how students’ play activities can be leveraged to support academic learning activities in developmentally appropriate ways.

 

Investigating the characteristics and efficacy of the Learning in Two Languages Program: A Research and development initiative

Language Attitude Assessment

Professor Alison Bailey, Ph.D.

Graduate School of Education & Information Studies

abailey@gseis.ucla.edu

Participants: Intermediate classrooms

Keywords: Dual Language Education, Linguistic Development

Collaborative processes in the construction of digital art

Students dancing to paint

Principal Investigator:

Randy Illum, CONNECT Fellowship Awardee 2016

Graduate School of Education & Information Studies
randy@remap.ucla.edu

Participants: Rooms 3 & 4 (Upper Level)

Keywords: Play-based learning, Science Inquiry, Art


This study will be comparing how collaboration between students, and how the students represent knowledge, changes when using traditional art-making methods, such as drawing with markers, when contrasted with digital body-based art making (painting on a digital canvas by moving one’s body through physical space). This aim of this research is to compare the ways in which young learners are able to collaborate and express concepts of space through a traditional method of art making, i.e. drawing with a marker, and through an emerging method of painting which allows a student to paint through their movement in space, enable by computational sensing. The purpose of the comparison between traditional methods of art making and body-based computational art making is to find if 1) students are able to create more meaningful and productive collaborations through body-based art making, or if the computational process hinders collaboration when compared to traditional methods; 2) if students are able to better express complex notion of a space through a body-based painting process when compared to traditional methods.

Exploring Relations Among Decoding, Phonemic Awareness, Executive function, and Rapid Automatized Naming in Kindergarten and First Grade

Assessing reading skills

Principal Investigator: Howard Alpert

Department of Human Development and Psychology
howalpert@g.ucla.edu

Participants: Rooms 3, 11, 12, 14, 15, & 16  (EC I & II, Primary)- Students ages 5-7

Keywords: Reading comprehension, Language acquisition, Decision Making


exploring_relations

Decoding is a basic part of reading. It is turning written words into spoken words. This project will clarify the distinct roles of phonemic awareness, executive function, and rapid automatized naming in relation to decoding. Past research established phonemic awareness-—using language sounds in rhymes and such—as central to decoding. Rapid automatized naming—the rate of naming printed letters, colors, etc.—also appears to play a role in decoding. Recent research suggests executive function—a broad term that, here, refers to keeping track of choices, inhibiting actions, and switching attention between attributes—as another possible factor. Executive function research has been limited because children’s executive function is difficult to measure. This study uses an innovative, game-like instrument to measure executive function. Distinguishing the roles of phonemic awareness,

Decoding is a basic part of reading. It is turning written words into spoken words. This project will clarify the distinct roles of phonemic awareness, executive function, and rapid automatized naming in relation to decoding. Past research established phonemic awareness-—using language sounds in rhymes and such—as central to decoding. Rapid automatized naming—the rate of naming printed letters, colors, etc.—also appears to play a role in decoding. Recent research suggests executive function—a broad term that, here, refers to keeping track of choices, inhibiting actions, and switching attention between attributes—as another possible factor. Executive function research has been limited because children’s executive function is difficult to measure. This study uses an innovative, game-like instrument to measure executive function. Distinguishing the roles of phonemic awareness,

Understanding what isn’t said: the acquisition of sluicing

Student Sluicing sentences with researchers

Principal Investigator: Nina Hyams

Department of Linguistics
howalpert@g.ucla.edu

Participants: Rooms 14, 15 & 16 – Students ages 4-6

Keywords: Language Acquisition, Contextual reading comprehension


understandingwhatisnot

This project investigates children’s understanding of ellipsis-i.e. sentences that contain omitted material that is understood by the linguistic context.  Children’s abilities to “sluice” implicit information, that is, sentences that require a child to recover information that is either stated earlier in a sentence or is retrievable from a context will provide interesting insights into their grammatical and cognitive development.  The study focuses on development in children between the ages of 4-6 years olds for which there have been no previous studies and their errors and difficulties could help investigations into what factors might produce better more efficient speech therapies going forward.

This project investigates children’s understanding of ellipsis-i.e. sentences that contain omitted material that is understood by the linguistic context.  Children’s abilities to “sluice” implicit information, that is, sentences that require a child to recover information that is either stated earlier in a sentence or is retrievable from a context will provide interesting insights into their grammatical and cognitive development.  The study focuses on development in children between the ages of 4-6 years olds for which there have been no previous studies and their errors and difficulties could help investigations into what factors might produce better more efficient speech therapies going forward.

Neural Correlates of Children’s Persistence, Engagement, Attention, and Self-Regulation

Principal Investigator:

Dr. Jennie Grammer

Graduate School of Education & Information Studies
grammer@g.ucla.edu

Participants: Rooms 3, 11,12,14 15 & 16 – Students ages 4-8

Keywords: Self Regulation, Executive function, motivation process


neural_correlates

Educators and researchers have become increasingly interested in the role that self-regulation, executive function, and motivational processes play in children’s success in school.  However, these constructs are rarely examined together, and relatively little is known about relations between them in early elementary school. Bringing together developmental, educational, and neuroscientific perspectives, the goal of this investigation is to understand the neurocognitive mechanisms that contribute to children’s self-regulation and persistence in school.  Specifically, the project seeks to examine children’s attentional focus and persistence on tasks they find challenging by exploring the neural markers of response monitoring using Electroencephalography (EEG).  In doing so, the hope is to explore the brain and behavioral processes that children engage in during challenging tasks and the effects on their academic skills.

Educators and researchers have become increasingly interested in the role that self-regulation, executive function, and motivational processes play in children’s success in school.  However, these constructs are rarely examined together, and relatively little is known about relations between them in early elementary school. Bringing together developmental, educational, and neuroscientific perspectives, the goal of this investigation is to understand the neurocognitive mechanisms that contribute to children’s self-regulation and persistence in school.  Specifically, the project seeks to examine children’s attentional focus and persistence on tasks they find challenging by exploring the neural markers of response monitoring using Electroencephalography (EEG).  In doing so, the hope is to explore the brain and behavioral processes that children engage in during challenging tasks and the effects on their academic skills.

Learning and reasoning with mathematical symbols: Connecting contextual mathematical thought to abstract, symbolic mathematical operations

Principal Investigator:

Jeffrey Bye, Ph.D.

Department of Psychology
jkgye@ucla.edu

Participants: Rooms 4, 5 & 6 – Students ages 10-12

Keywords: Purpose Driven Progressive Formaliztion (P-PF), interactive multi-media videos for algebraic learning


learning_math

The concept of an algebraic variable is both important in its own right and foundational for higher levels of mathematics, but many students struggle to understand the meaning and purpose of a variable. Common math education practices often fail to support students in making meaningful insights about the interpretation of a variable, its mathematical purpose, or its relevance in solving real-world problems. Such conceptual impoverishment prevents these students from appreciating algebra and from building on its concepts in more advanced math. This project seeks to assess new educational materials, in the form of online multimedia videos, that encourage and support students’ discovery of the meaning and purpose of a variable, guided by principles from educational psychology and the cognitive psychology of learning.

The concept of an algebraic variable is both important in its own right and foundational for higher levels of mathematics, but many students struggle to understand the meaning and purpose of a variable. Common math education practices often fail to support students in making meaningful insights about the interpretation of a variable, its mathematical purpose, or its relevance in solving real-world problems. Such conceptual impoverishment prevents these students from appreciating algebra and from building on its concepts in more advanced math. This project seeks to assess new educational materials, in the form of online multimedia videos, that encourage and support students’ discovery of the meaning and purpose of a variable, guided by principles from educational psychology and the cognitive psychology of learning.

A comparison of Traditional and digital body-based methods of art making

Principal Investigator:

Randy Illum

Graduate School of Education & Information Studies
randy@remap.ucla.edu

Participants: Rooms 4, 5 & 6 – Students ages 10-12

Keywords: Computer-Supported collaborative learning, digital art-making, motivation process


randy_painting

This study will be comparing how collaboration between students, and how the students represent knowledge, changes when using traditional art-making methods, such as drawing with markers, when contrasted with digital body-based art making (painting on a digital canvas by moving one’s body through physical space).  This aim of this research is to compare the ways in which young learners are able to collaborate and express concepts of space through a traditional method of artmaking, i.e. drawing with a marker, and through an emerging method of painting which allows a student to paint through their movement in space, enable by computational sensing. The purpose of the comparison between traditional methods of artmaking and body-based computational artmaking is to find if 1) students are able to create more meaningful and productive collaborations through body-based artmaking, or if the computational process hinders collaboration when comparted to traditional methods; 2) if students are able to better express complex notion of a space through a body-based painting process when compared to traditional methods.

This study will be comparing how collaboration between students, and how the students represent knowledge, changes when using traditional art-making methods, such as drawing with markers, when contrasted with digital body-based art making (painting on a digital canvas by moving one’s body through physical space).  This aim of this research is to compare the ways in which young learners are able to collaborate and express concepts of space through a traditional method of artmaking, i.e. drawing with a marker, and through an emerging method of painting which allows a student to paint through their movement in space, enable by computational sensing. The purpose of the comparison between traditional methods of artmaking and body-based computational artmaking is to find if 1) students are able to create more meaningful and productive collaborations through body-based artmaking, or if the computational process hinders collaboration when comparted to traditional methods; 2) if students are able to better express complex notion of a space through a body-based painting process when compared to traditional methods.

Analytics Validation for PBS KIDS Science Games

Principal Investigator: Greg Chung
Graduate School of Education & Information Studies (CRESST) chung@cresst.org
Participants: Rooms 3, 11 & 12 – Students ages 6-8
Keywords: gameplay meaures for Inquiry, Engagement, Affect, Content Knowledge


sciencegame

While many educational games strive to adapt for an optimal gaming and learning experience, there is relatively little research on creating algorithms for adaptivity This study seeks to understand the efficacy of algorithms embedded in educational science games that adapt the user experience according to the player’s actions and performance in order to deliver a superior learning experience. The study will also lead to the development of new algorithms based upon the observational data we collect in order to further the adaptive capabilities of the games. Participants will be observed playing science games (aligned with the Next Generation Science Standards), developed by PBS KIDS. Video data and clickstream data will be collected, and players will participate in 2 short interviews with researchers to understand their background knowledge of the science concepts, attitudes toward science, experience with digital games, and experience playing the games. Data will be analyzed qualitatively to understand the players’ experience of the game adaptivity, and new algorithms will be developed based upon observations of player behavior.

Incubation and Creativity Across Development

Principal Investigator: Gerardo Ramirez
Graduate School of Education & Information Studies (CRESST) gerardoramirez@ucla.edu
Participants: Rooms 1,2, 3, 11,12,18, – Students ages 6-10


Creative-thinking skills play a central role in allowing students to escape conventional knowledge and make innovative contributions to society. Mathematical creativity refers to the ability to think flexibly about numerical relationships, to apply novel problem solving approaches, and to bridge remote ideas between mathematical concepts—all qualities of the most advanced mathematicians. We propose that educational contexts that strictly adhere to convention and reproduction at the cost of innovation, self-generation, and divergent thinking, stifles the potential of creative students. The goal of our proposed program of work is to investigate the educational contexts that encourage mathematical creativity and to examine how we can leverage the power of underlying unconscious thinking processes to better enhance the development of creative ability in mathematics. Lab school children will be given one math problem and asked to produce as many strategies as they can for 3 minutes. Some children will be given a break. Everyone will then tackle the same problem for an additional 3 minutes. Children will also complete some simple questionnaires examining attitudes around math. We hope to recruit a sample of 1st,2nd and 4th or 5th grade children. The math task children are asked to solve will serve as a measure of flexible math thinking.

The Role of Social and Emotional Context in the Development of Decision Making Processes

Principal Investigator:
Professor Jennifer Silvers Ph.D.
Department of Psychology

Silvers@ucla.edu
Participants: Rooms5, 6 & 4 – Students ages 10-12
Keywords: Decision Making, Self-control, Emotional regulation


decisionmaking

The current study seeks to understand how social and emotional information influences adolescent self-control and decision making. Specifically, we will examine how adolescents make decisions about risk and reward in different contexts. This research is the latest in a line of work by members of the Social Affective Neuroscience & Development lab that investigates how emotional and social processes influence well-being in youth (e.g., Silvers et al., 2016, Cerebral Cortex; Guassi Moreira & Telzer, 2016, Developmental Science). The specific aims of the study are (1) to understand whether practicing emotion regulation primes better impulse control during decision making in risky contexts (2) and whether adolescents refrain from risk taking when they realize that others are affected by their choices. Hopefully, the results of this current study will go on to inform future educational interventions aimed at improving students’ decision making and self-control